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As a professional acupuncturist since 2000 Dr. Gong has practiced general acupuncture both in China and in the United States. Her services include acupuncture, cupping, massage, herbals, and other Traditional Chinese Medicine. Average cost (per session) ranges from $60 to $80, with accepted payment methods in cash or check.

Acupuncture

Acupuncture

Acupuncture is a complex branch of ancient Chinese medicine, and the word literally means “needle piercing", the practice of inserting very fine needles into the skin to stimulate specific anatomic points in the body (called acupoints or acupuncture points).  Along with the usual method of puncturing the skin with fine needles, practitioners of acupuncture also use heat, pressure, friction, suction, or impulses of electromagnetic energy to stimulate the points.  The acupoints are stimulated to balance the movement of energy in the body to restore health.

Acupuncture promotes natural healing.  It can improve recuperative power, enhance immunity, support physical and emotional health and improve overall function and well-being.  It is a safe, painless and effective way to treat a wide variety of medical conditions.

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Chi Kung

Qigong or Chi Kung

Qigong (Chi Kung) is an ancient Chinese health care system that integrates physical postures, breathing techniques and focused intention.

The word Qigong is made up of two Chinese words. Qi is pronounced chee and is usually translated to mean the life force or vital-energy that flows through all things in the universe. The second word, Gong, pronounced gung, means accomplishment, or skill that is cultivated through steady practice. Together, Qigong (Chi Kung) means cultivating energy, it is a system practiced for health maintenance, healing and increasing vitality.

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Cupping

Cupping

Developed thousands of years ago with modernized techniques and probably gaining much more popularity recently from the Rio Olympic Games, cupping may be regarded as the inverse of massage. Rather than applying pressure to muscles, the suction uses pressure to pull skin, tissue and muscles upward. Cupping may be combined with acupuncture into one treatment, but it could also be used alone.

Cupping involves placing glass, bamboo or plastic jars on the skin and creating a vacuum by suctioning out the air. The underlying tissue is raised, or sucked, partway into the cup. The purpose of cupping is to enhance circulation, help relieve pain, remove "heat" and pull out the toxins that linger in your body's tissues.

You usually will feel a tight sensation in the area of the cup. Often, this sensation is relaxing and soothing. Depending on your comfort and your practitioner's assessment of the problem, cups may be moved around or left in place. They may remain on your body briefly or for longer amounts of time. Each treatment is unique to you on that particular day. One very common area to be cupped is the back, although cups work well on other areas, too — particularly on fleshy sections of the body.

 

Electro Acupuncture

Electro Acupuncture

Electro-acupuncture is relatively a new technique, it applies a pulsating electrical current to acupuncture needles, or even without needles to acupuncture points on the body. The idea behind it corresponds directly with long-held beliefs. Acupuncture operates on the idea that a person's qi, or life force, runs through body along certain meridians, and that specific points on the body correspond with these meridians. When these points are ‘activated' or stimulated by touch, specific complaints of chronic pain or illnesses can be alleviated. Using a gentle electrical current in conjunction with, or instead of, acupuncture needles, is an alternative way to stimulate the point and enhance the qi.

The procedure for electro-acupuncture usually involves the needles inserted as in a traditional treatment, but a small electrode is attached to them. This electrode provides a gentle vibration that stimulates the qi running through these points. It is often very soothing to the patient, providing a soft humming and, essentially, a more fluid treatment. The electrode substitutes the practitioners' hand maneuvering of the needle to activate the acupuncture point. This avoids any tiring of the practitioner, and ensures that the patient receives the proper amount of stimulation needed. Also, electro-acupuncture treatments are often shorter than regular acupuncture treatments due to the continued, and often stronger, stimulus.

While electro-acupuncture may be used as a component of almost all acupuncture treatments, it is has garnered especially good results regarding the treatment of neurological diseases, chronic pain, spasms, and paralysis. Also, holistic sports medicine commonly uses electro-acupuncture for injuries. When combined with acupressure (the stimulation of acupuncture points with the use of the practitioner's hands and gentle massage, instead of needles), electro-acupuncture has been proven to promote the flow of qi and blood, relieve pain, and warm the muscles, removing blood stasis (a blockage, or poor circulation).

Using the same points as traditional acupuncture, electro-acupuncture is a convenient stimulation technique that can be used for a variety of treatments. In cases of stubborn neurological disorders and chronic pain, electro-acupuncture may be the best option for point stimulation and effective treatments.

 

Gua Sha

Gua Sha

WHAT IS GUA SHA?

Gua Sha is a therapeutic technique that involves lightly scraping the skin with a special handheld tool. This painless procedure is typically done on the back of the neck or on the back itself, with long or short strokes following specific energy lines.

Gua Sha raises tiny pinpoint red or purplish marks on the skin called “petechiae.” The marks generally last a few days to a week and are not painful or uncomfortable. Gua Sha does not damage the skin or underlying tissues.

WHAT DOES GUA SHA TREAT?

By raising petechiae, Gua Sha sets off a cascade effect in the immune system, bringing natural antibodies to the local area. This makes Gua Sha an excellent treatment option in the early stages of a cold or flu, particularly when there is stiffness and body aches. By boosting the immune system, Gua Sha can help the body ward off exterior pathogenic factors that might otherwise manifest into full-blown illness or it can shorten the duration of a cold or flu. Scientific research indicates that a single Gua Sha treatment can result in a significant boost to the immune system.

Gua Sha is also a great way to relieve pain because it promotes blood flow to a specific area of the body and also helps the body to release anti-inflammatory agents. Typically, Gua Sha is used to treat tight muscles in the neck and upper back, but may also be used on wrists, knees, and even the bottoms of the feet to promote circulation.

 

Herbal Medicine

Herbal Medicine and Nutrition

Modern research and medical breakthroughs bring us better understanding and appreciation for the medicines that have existed and been used effectively by our ancestors for hundreds of years.  Through clinical trials and advanced research we can learn more about the botanical and nutritional medicines our ancestors used in a very scientific and clinical way.  There is also a tremendous amount of traditional use and study on the therapeutic potential of herbal medicine and nutrition practices and countless case studies illustrating their positive influence on a variety health issues.  We are now able to utilize the traditional study of herbs and time honored nutrition along with modern scientific research together to generate a well-informed understanding of the therapeutic potential of medicinal plants and holistic nutrition.

Herbal medicine has a unique offering in today’s demand for individualized treatments and personalized medicine. In our current culture that has divided medicine into specialists for every illness and field of practice and specific labels for everything.  We need to understand that sometimes the answer is not to isolate, but to look at the body as a whole. Symptoms and diseases sometimes present themselves differently from person to person. Perhaps a broken arm is a broken arm in every person but the way our internal systems function, the way hidden illnesses manifest is very different from person to person and can often be misdiagnosed because of our tendency to isolate and label.

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Massage

Tuina and Medical Massage

The term Tui Na (or Tuina, pronounced "twee naw"), which literally means "pinch and pull," refers to a wide range of Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM) therapeutic massage and body work.

Tui Na is not generally used for pleasure and relaxation, but rather as a treatment to address specific patterns of disharmony. As such, practitioners use it for many of the same reasons and according to the same principles as acupuncture. Like acupuncture, TCM uses tui na to harmonize yin and yang in the body by manipulating the Qi in the acupuncture channels.

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Moxibustion

Moxibustion

Moxibustion (also referred to as “moxa”) is a form of heat therapy that is used in Chinese medicine to invigorate the flow of “qi” (energy), blood, lymph and other body fluids while dispelling certain pathogenic influences. The substance is an herb called mugwort or Artemisia vulgaris, which we burn and hover close to the skin over specific acupuncture points. This herb is so integral in Chinese medicine treatments that the ancient Chinese character for acupuncture (“zhenjiu,” which is pronounced “juhn-jee-yew” ) is translated literally as “acupuncture/moxibustion.”

Moxibustion is a very warm and relaxing addition to an acupuncture treatment, and is often used instead of acupuncture for those who are especially sensitive to needles. In fact, there are some properties of moxibustion that exceed the capabilities of the acupuncture needles. Depending on the condition being treated, we might use more moxibustion than acupuncture or vice versa. Moxibustion is so good at boosting energy and improving immunity, that we sometimes teach patients how to moxa themselves and send them home with the tools and instructions for doing so.

Nutrition

Herbal Medicine and Nutrition

Modern research and medical breakthroughs bring us better understanding and appreciation for the medicines that have existed and been used effectively by our ancestors for hundreds of years.  Through clinical trials and advanced research we can learn more about the botanical and nutritional medicines our ancestors used in a very scientific and clinical way.  There is also a tremendous amount of traditional use and study on the therapeutic potential of herbal medicine and nutrition practices and countless case studies illustrating their positive influence on a variety health issues.  We are now able to utilize the traditional study of herbs and time honored nutrition along with modern scientific research together to generate a well-informed understanding of the therapeutic potential of medicinal plants and holistic nutrition.

Herbal medicine has a unique offering in today’s demand for individualized treatments and personalized medicine. In our current culture that has divided medicine into specialists for every illness and field of practice and specific labels for everything.  We need to understand that sometimes the answer is not to isolate, but to look at the body as a whole. Symptoms and diseases sometimes present themselves differently from person to person. Perhaps a broken arm is a broken arm in every person but the way our internal systems function, the way hidden illnesses manifest is very different from person to person and can often be misdiagnosed because of our tendency to isolate and label.

Read More

Qigong

Qigong or Chi Kung

Qigong (Chi Kung) is an ancient Chinese health care system that integrates physical postures, breathing techniques and focused intention.

The word Qigong is made up of two Chinese words. Qi is pronounced chee and is usually translated to mean the life force or vital-energy that flows through all things in the universe.  The second word, Gong, pronounced gung, means accomplishment, or skill that is cultivated through steady practice. Together, Qigong (Chi Kung) means cultivating energy, it is a system practiced for health maintenance, healing and increasing vitality.

Read More

 

Tai Chi

Tai Chi

The beauty of Tai Chi (or Taji) is in its gentle form of exercise; thus, it is for everyone.  It helps maintain strength, flexibility, and balance, and could be the perfect activity for the rest of your life.

As some put: no pain, big gains.  Tai Chi is often described as "meditation in motion," but it might well be called "medication in motion." There is growing evidence that this mind-body practice, which originated in China as a martial art has value in treating or preventing many health problems. And you can get started even if you aren't in top shape or the best of health.

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Tui Na

Tui Na and Medical Massage

The term Tui Na (or Tuina, pronounced "twee naw"), which literally means "pinch and pull" refers to a wide range of Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM) therapeutic massage and body work.

Tui Na is not generally used for pleasure and relaxation, but rather as a treatment to address specific patterns of disharmony. As such, practitioners use it for many of the same reasons and according to the same principles as acupuncture. Like acupuncture, TCM uses tui na to harmonize yin and yang in the body by manipulating the Qi in the acupuncture channels.

Read More

 

Dr. Gong's services include other Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM) techniques. Feel free to talk to her for your more health needs.

 

About Us

 

Yang Gong

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Yang Gong, Licensed Acupuncturist (L Ac), DAc.

 

Kansas City location - Overland Park:

 8600 W 95th Street

    Suite 212B
    Overland Park, Kansas 66212

 (913) 721-7295

 (620) 363-1685

 gracefamilyacupuncture@gmail.com

  Mon - Thur:  8:30 AM - 7:00 PM

 

Iola location:

 204 S Buckeye Street

    Iola, Kansas 66749

 (620) 363-1685

 gracefamilyacupuncture@gmail.com

  Fri - Sat:  by appointment only

 

Kansas City Location - Overland Park

   8600 W 95th Street
      Suite 212B
      Overland Park, Kansas 66212

 (913) 721-7295

 (620) 363-1685

 gracefamilyacupuncture@gmail.com

Mon - Thur: 8:30 am - 7:00 pm

 

IOLA LOCATION

 by appointment only:
    204 S Buckeye Street
    Iola, Kansas 66749

 (620) 363-1685

 

 gracefamilyacupuncture@gmail.com

Fri - Sat: by appoinment

 

Services and Conditions Treated

SERVICES

Acupuncture
Chi Gong
Cupping
Electro Acupuncture
Gua Sha
Herbal Medicine
Massage
Moxibustion
Nutrition
Qigong
Tai Chi
Tui Na

CONDITIONS TREATED

Allergies
Arthritis
Back Pain
Infertility
Losing Weight
Migraine
Muscle Aches
Natural Healing
Neck Pain
OB-GYN
Shoulder Pain
Skin Diseases
Stroke
Weight Loss